St. Louis Museum of Transportation


Locomotives



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American Steel Foundaries Whitcomb 65 Ton No. 8 American Steel Foundaries Whitcomb 65 Ton No. 8 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Whitcomb in 1948.
Georgia Railroad 0-6-0 No. 724 Georgia Railroad 0-6-0 No. 724 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: This coal-burner had the distinction of being the last conventional steam locomotive to regularly operate in the St. Louis area, switching hopper cars at the Pacific, MO gravel plant of Nasic Materials Co. until 1963. Built in 1896 by Baldwin Locomotive Works for the Georgia Railroad and reboilered in 1923, it was successively numbered Georgia 49, 722, and finally 724. In 1941, the locomotive was acquired by the East St. Louis Junction Railroad, a line serving local stockyards in Illinois, across the Mississippi from St. Louis. In the early 1950s, the 0-6-0-type "fantail" switcher (so named because of its sloping tender which provided better crew visibility) was purchased by St. Louis Material & Supply, which later became Basic Materials.
Boston & Maine B-2 No. 1180 Boston & Maine B-2 No. 1180 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B-B No. 50 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad B-B No. 50 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Number 50 was the first successful, non-articulated diesel-electric passenger locomotive delivered in 1935 by General Motor's Electro-Motive Corp. While earlier models were semi-permanantly coupled to a train, Number 50 was a seperate, double-ended unit, generating a total of 1,800 horsepower from its two Winton Model 201-A engines. Equipped with a steam boiler to provide passenger train heat, the locomotive was originally assigned to the B&O's Royal Blue between Jersey City, NJ and Washington D.C. Two years later, Number 50 and the train were sent to the Midwest and the B&O-controlled Alton Railroad where, as the Abraham Lincoln, the passenger train now ran between St. Louis and Chicago. In 1945, the pioneer engine was placed in local freight service. It was subsequently rebuilt again and powered Chicago-area suburban trains until retirement in 1956. It was saved from a scrapyard in 1958.
Boston & Providence Railroad Daniel Nason Boston & Providence Railroad Daniel Nason is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: The oldest steam locomotive in the MOT collection and one of the oldest surviving locomotives in the nation, the Daniel Nason, was built between 1858 and 1863 by the Boston & Providence Railroad in its Roxbury, MA shop, one of 28 which were produced by the railroad under the direction of George S. Griggs. Although Mr. Griggs called himself a "machinst," he was actually one of the country's most experienced locomotive designers. With a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement, the locomotive is the only surviving "insider," a design popular with railroads before the Civil War, with cylinders and main driving rods between (rather than outside of) the locomotive side frames. The locomotive, which had a top speed of 60 miles per hour, later became Old Colony Railroad No. 170 when that line took over the B&P. It then was used as an historic relic by the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, which absorbed the Old Colony in 1892. Backdated with a typical woodburner smokestack even though it burned coal, it was displayed at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
Chicago Burlington & Quincy E8 No. 9939A Chicago Burlington & Quincy E8 No. 9939A is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: CB&Q No. 9939A, was delivered in January 1950 by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division (EMD) as a 2,250-hp E-8A locomotive. It became Burlington Northern Railroad No. 9939 in 1970 and West Suburban (Chicago) Mass Transit District No. 9902 in 1973, shortly after it was rebuilt into a 2,400-hp E8Au, giving it power equivilant to later-generation E-9 locomotives manufactured by EMD. The unit has two V-12 diesel engines, in contrast to a single V-16 diesel in most freight units. The locomotive operated interchangeably in both long-haul passenger and Chicago-area commuter service on the Burlington Route, which extracted maximum mileage from its engines through such dual usage. Eventually it was assigned soley to "push-pull" Burlington commuter service. It was then sold to the State of Maryland (MARC) where it was renumbered 64. In 2002 it was repainted to its CBQ appearance.
Chicago Burlington & Quincy Silver Charger No. 9908 Chicago Burlington & Quincy Silver Charger No. 9908 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Number 9008 was the last power car produced for the Burlington in the "shovel nose" streamlined design of earlier Zephyr units. Delivered by General Motors' Electro-Motive Corporation and Budd Co. in April 1939, the Silver Charger was more structurally advanced than its predecesors and was ordered for the last General Pershing Zephyr schedule between St. Louis and Kansas City. It boasted a 1,000-hp Model 567 diesel engine, with seperate baggage space located at the rear of the unit. The veteran diesel went on to outlive many of its streamlined counterparts and eventually became the last "shovel-nosed" engine in service, heading a mail-express train between St. Louis and Burlington, IA each night until it was retired in 1965.
Chicago & Illinois Midland 2-8-2 No. 551 Chicago & Illinois Midland 2-8-2 No. 551 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built in 1928 by Lima.
Canadian National 4-6-2 No. 5529 Canadian National 4-6-2 No. 5529 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built in Montreal in 1906.
Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 No. 2727
Chesapeake & Ohio 2-8-4 No. 2727
Chesapeake & Ohio 20804 No. 2727 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: This 105-foot long fiant could generate more than 5,000 horsepower as it pulled heavy, fast freight trains through the Allegheny mountain country of Virginia and West Virginia. Built by the American Locomotive Co. in 1944 as part of an order of 40 locomotives, No. 2727 is classified as a Kanawha for a West Virginia river that flows through the C&O's operating area and weighs 425 tons. It saw just 13 years of service before joining the MOT collection.
Delaware, Lackawana & Western 4-4-0 No. 952 Delaware, Lackawana & Western 4-4-0 No. 952 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: This locomotive, a 1905 product of the American Locomotive Co., is the only surviving "Mother Hubbard" (or camelback) 4-4-0 type locomotive. Its wide "Wooten" firebox burned hard anthracite coal and necessitated the cab's location on top of the boiler. Number 952 was exhibited at the 1939-40 New York World's Fair and was transported to MOT as part of a freight train in 1953.
Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range 2-10-2 No. 502 Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range 2-10-2 No. 502 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Baldwin in 1916.
Erie Lackawana SD45 No. 3607
Erie Lackawana SD45 No. 3607
Erie Lackawana SD45 No. 3607 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by EMD in 1967.
St. Louis-San Francisco 2-10-0 No. 1621 St. Louis-San Francisco 2-10-0 No. 1621 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Baldwin in 1918.
St. Louis-San Francisco 4-8-2 No. 1522 St. Louis-San Francisco 4-8-2 No. 1522 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built in 1926 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works for $70,000 No. 1522 is an oil-burning 4-8-2 Mountain-type engine which worked 1.7 million miles in regular passenger and freight service, mainly on the Frisco's Eastern and Southwest Divisions.
General Motors No. 103 General Motors No. 103 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Number 103 is a cab unit of the first successful main line, diesel-electric freight locomotive in America, built by GM in 1939. Two cabs and two booster units comprised the 5,400-hp locomotive, which was known as "The Diesel That Did It." The demonstrator proved the efficiency of diesel power compared to the steam locomotive and the success of its national tour was the beginning of the end of steam power on freight trains. Geared for a top speed of 75 mph, the diesel consistently out-pulled steam power, including the modern Santa Fe 5000-class engines. It was eventually sold to the Southern Railway, which donated it to MOT in 1960.
Illinois Terminal Class B No. 1575 Illinois Terminal Class B No. 1575 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by IT in 1918.
Illinois Terminal Class C No. 1595 Illinois Terminal Class B No. 1575 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: This Class C freight locomotive was built in 1929 in the Decatur, IL shops of the Illinois Traction System (later the Illinois Terminal Railroad). Considered one of the most succesful electric "interurbans" of the first half of the 20th century, the Illinois Terminal operated both passenger and freight service between downtown St. Louis and central Illinois, crossing the Mississippi River on the McKinley Bridge. Featuring a four-truck articulated design which permitted safe weight distribution on bridges and enabled it to negotiate tight curves on in-city streets, No. 1595 is 52 feet long and weighs 160,000 pounds. Its eight General Electric motors, which received 600-volt DC power through a trolley pole from overhead wires, could generate 1,500 continuous horsepower. The locomotive was donated to MOT in 1956 when the railroad ended both long-haul passenger and electrified freight service.
Joplin-Pittsburgh Plymouth 70-Ton No. 2003 Joplin-Pittsburgh Plymouth 70-Ton No. 2003 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Plymouth in 1936.
Lake Street Elevated 0-4-4T No. 9 Lake Street Elevated 0-4-4T No. 9 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: The "Charles H" is representative of the more than 400 "Forney" steam locomotives used on elevated transit lines in New York City, Brooklyn, and Chicago from the late 1870s until just after the dawn of the 20th century. The engine is named for Charles H. Deere, son of John Deere, the second President of Deere & Company and a board member of Chicago's Lake Street Elevated, for which Number 9 was built in 1893 by Rhode Island Locomotive Works. Matthias Forney originally designed the locomotives for main line service, although their principal usage was on elevated transit lines and by some suburban and short-line railroads; most were built after Forney's patent had expired. The lightweight engines were found to be ideal for elevated service, where they were flexible in negotiating sharp curves and offered good cab visibility in both directions, important because they could not be turned around at the end of a trip. All of these locomotives were replaced by electric power, and the Charles H., after its Chicago service, traveled to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan where it worked on three lumber railroads, then to a Wells, MI chemical plant. It subsequently was relocated to a Rusk, TX steel plant where it was converted to burn oil, and its final years of operation were spent at a Mexican steel plant.
MARC E8A No. 66 MARC E8A No. 66 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Former CB&Q unit that was built in 1954 by EMD.
Manufacturers Railway S2 No. 211 Manufacturers Railway S2 No. 211 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built in 1948 by Alco.
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad IB+D+D+BI No. E2 Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad IB+D+D+BI No. E2 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Generating up to 3,200 continuous horsepower, No. E2 was used primarily to pull transcontinental passenger trains (including the famed Olympian Hiawatha) between othello and Tacoma, WA, through the Cascade Mountains. The 76-foot long electrically powered locomotive, weighing 260 tons, is the only survivor of five built for the Milwaukee Road in 1919 by General Electric. No. E2 used motors built around the axles, rather than geared to them as is done today. It was called a "bi-polar" design because of the two motor field magnet cores, one on each side of the motorized axles. The locomotive is joined in three flexible sections for the mountain curves, with the center section containing the steam boiler used for heating the train's passenger cars. Water-powered generators in the mountains sent 100,000-volt AC power to substations which converted it to 3,000 volts DC; the locomotive received power from overhead wires through "pantograph" devices located at either end of the cab roof. These EP-2 class locomotives were capable of pulling 12 passenger cars at 65 miles per hour on level track (25 mph on a 2% grade), and one of them beat a steam locomotive in a widely publicized tug of war. No. E2 was displayed in Chicago at the 1933-34 World's Fair and 1848-49 Railroad Fair.
Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad 4-4-0 No. 311 Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad 4-4-0 No. 311 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Baldwin in 1890.
New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad 4-6-4 No. 170 New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad 4-6-4 No. 170 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: No. 170 was donated to MOT in 1957 after operating nearly 2 million miles on the Nickel Plate, equivilant to 80 trips around the globe. Built in 1927 by the American Locomotive Co., the 268-ton giant was used in high-speed passenger service until the mid-1940s, averaging approximately 90,000 miles per year. In the summer of 1946, No. 170 was rebuilt with roller bearings and "elephant ears." Thereafter, until its retirement in late 1957, it was assigned to haul "extra" passenger and light freight trains. No. 170 is the oldest surviving "Hudson" locomotive.
Norfolk & Western 2-8-8-2 No. 2156 Norfolk & Western 2-8-8-2 No. 2156 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: The N&W's Roanoke, VA shops produced this massive 2-8-8-2 engine in 1942 at a cost of $136,924, the second in a series of 16 Class Y6a "Mallet" locomotives. At 961,500 pounds, No. 2156 is only slightly "smaller" than MOT's Union Pacific "big Boy." Because of its size, the engine is articulated and it boasts a compound design which uses steam twice. Exhaust steam from the smaller rear cylinders is used a second time in the much larger front set before escaping up the smokestack; the lower pressure of this steam requires the front cylinders to be bigger. By the time of its retirement in April 1959, No. 2156 had accumulated a total of 1,000,973 operating miles.
New York Central 2D2 No. 113 New York Central 2D2 No. 113 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: This Class S2 electric locomotive, built in 1906 by Alco-General Electric, was one of 34 designed originally to haul passenger trains on electrified trackage between New York City's Grand Central Terminal and Harmon, NY, a distance of 33 miles. Employing an early "bi-polar" design, with its motors built around the axles rather than being linked to them by gears, the locomotive operated on 660 volts DC and produced 2,200hp. Power generally was obtained from an electrified "third rail," although small pantographs on the top of the engine were used for current collection from an overhead wire when No. 113 operated through complex switches in New York City's Park Avenue tunnel. Although gradually replaced by more powerful electric engines, No. 113 and a few of its sisters remained in operation into the 1960s, switching cars in Grand Central Terminal.
New York Central 4-8-2 No. 2933 New York Central 4-8-2 No. 2933 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Between 1916 and 1943, the New York Central acquired 544 4-8-2 "Mohawk" type locomotives for its vast freight operations extending from the East Coast to the Midwest, with later models incorporating features which permitted their use in heaby passenger work. The American Locomotive Co., Schenectady, NY produced No. 2933 in 1929. The 185-ton engine is one of only ywo large, modern NYC steam locomotives still in existence.
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Aerotrain No. 3 Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Aerotrain No. 3 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: General Motors employed lightweight construction and low center-of-gravity concepts in two "Aerotrains" built in 1955, each comprising a futuristic locomotive and 10 cars accomodating a total of approximately 400 passengers. The locomotive style was conceived by GM's automotive designers, but all of GM's division helped design and build this relatively low-cost train, intended to be cheap to operate. The aerotrains were tested by the New York Central, Pennsylvania, and Union Pacific railroads in regular passenger service and demonstrated to manu others, but none were ordered. The Aerotrains were then sold to the Rock Island in 1958 for suburban passenger service between Chicago and Joliet, IL, where they lasted less than a decade. Despite their futuristic appearance, the Aerotrains, whose coaches were basically widened bus bodies, rode poorly at high speed. This problem, together with the lack of switching flexibility for the semi-permanently coupled trains and special maintenance requirements, caused their replacement by double deck commuter cars on April 23, 1965.
Santa Fe 2-10-4 No. 5011 Santa Fe 2-10-4 No. 5011 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Baldwin in 1944.
Sabine River & Northern B-B No. 408 Sabine River & Northern B-B No. 408 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by EMC in 1937.
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern 4-6-0 No. 635 St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern 4-6-0 No. 635 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Baldwin in 1889.
St. Louis Water Division Whitcomb 15-Ton No. 1 St. Louis Water Division Whitcomb 15-Ton No. 1 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Whitcomb in 1924.
Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis 0-8-0 No. 318
Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis 0-8-0 No. 318
Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis 0-8-0 No. 318 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: "Home-built" in the TRRA's Brooklyn, IL shops in 1928, this coal-burning locomotive was one of 180 steam engines operated in the peak years of the St. Louis-area belt and switching railroad. No. 318 was the first locomotive ever built to incorporate a one-piece cast-steel bed which included its cylinders. These beds, designed and manufactured by Commonwealth Steel Co., are regarded as among the most intricate and difficult of castings. The locomotive's tender has a one-piece tank bottom, with side sheets and bracing all welded to eliminate problems associated with riveting. No. 318, because of its substantial weight, was viewed as particulary dependable for hauling heavy trains over the Mississippi River bridges and wherever else steep grades and sharp track curves called for extra power.
Union Pacific 4-8-8-4 No. 4006
Union Pacific 4-8-8-4 No. 4006
Union Pacific 4-8-8-4 No. 4006 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Known as the "Big Boy" because of its immense size and power, this model is the world's largest successfully operated steam locomotive. The Union Pacific ordered 25 of the 4-8-8-4 articulated engines from the American Locomotive Co. to haul heavy freight trains through the Rocky Mountains between Green River (later Cheyenne), WY and Ogden, UT. No. 4006 was delivered in 1941. Weighing 600 tons in working condition, the Big Boy is 132 feet long, had a top speed of 80mph, and could generate a maximum 6,900 horsepower. The giant locomotive continued in service until the late 1950s.
Union Pacific DD40AX No. 6944 Union Pacific DD40AX No. 6944 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by EMD in 1971.
Union Pacific U28C No. 2804 Union Pacific U28C No. 2804 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by General Electric in 1966.
United States Army I-B-I No. 1149 United States Army I-B-I No. 1149 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by Davenport in 1954.
United States Army GE 25-Ton No. 7765 United States Army GE 25-Ton No. 7765 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by General Electric in 1943.
United States Army MRS1 No. B-2069 United States Army MRS1 No. B-2069 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built by GE-Alco in 1950.
Wabash 2-6-0 No. 573 Wabash 2-6-0 No. 573 is on display at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.

Museum Notes: Built in Rhode Island in 1899.
Unknown Locomotive An unknown locomotive awaits restoration at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.
Unknown Locomotive An unknown locomotive awaits restoration at the St. Louis Museum of Transportation on 13 August 2004.


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